Pathway 1 to Emotionally Healthy Spirituality

The first pathway of Emotionally Healthy Spirituality (as laid out by Pete Scazzero) is Know Yourself that You May Know God. We started the conversation on Sunday by Current Sermon Series again to the story of David and Goliath in 1 Samuel 17. Here are some things to help you keep up the good work!

Consider the dangerous messages about feelings and emotions our culture has given us– especially for men and young boys. Is there a more God-honouring way?

Use this exercise to help you think through whether an idea is the truth about who you are, or a lie that is trying to bind you into a life and identity that doesn’t belong to you.

And here’s a meaningful prayer exercise you can use to help you think through your inner thoughts and daily activities in order to know yourself and God better.

 

Emotionally Healthy Spirituality Week 1

Emotionally Healthy Spirituality.jpgWe’re doing a churchwide series using material from Peter & Geri Scazzero called Emotionally Healthy Spirituality. During this first week, we thought about the cost of emotional and spiritual immaturity by looking at Saul’s struggle in 1 Samuel 15. We closed our worship time asking the Holy Spirit to bring to our attention our areas of immaturity.

One of the ‘symptoms’ of emotionally unhealthy spirituality (as outlined by Pete in his book) is “Ignoring the emotions of anger, sadness, and fear.” Our links today provide some ideas on what to do instead of ignoring them.

Learn from David’s approach to fear and anger in “Two Quick Remedies for Anger, Hurt, and Fear.”

The Institute for Faith, Work & Economics helps us think through common fears that workers experience.

Finally, for those of us who carry sadness and regret about the past, there’s “How to Live with Regret” by Bill Lokey.

Sunday Follow-up

On Sunday, one of our missionaries, Caleb Brownhill, shared a message from Romans 12 and Genesis 3 about being transformed from the patterns of this world to the ways of God. You can listen to that message on our current sermons media player.

We’ve provided some further reading on three of the main ideas Caleb helped us understand as we seek to grow in Christian maturity.

First, the shift from the selfish life to the God-centred life requires a hard look within. Read more in “The Antidote for Selfishness is You.”

Second, recognize when you’re shifting the blame. We’ve linked to this article before, but it’s that good: “Blame-Shifting Away our Sin.”

Third, journey towards maturity. What does maturity look like? When it comes to how we see and treat ourselves, St. Bernard has some thoughts: “When Love Grows Up”.  And just in case you think that spiritual maturity is all about seriousness, be encouraged by “God and Laughter.”