More Than a Sabbath

SabbathWe love this series from The High Calling a few years ago. Take the time… perhaps even on a Sabbath, to read how Sabbath principles can be lived.

More Than a Sabbath: My Fast From Producing

More Than a Sabbath: My Fast from Ladder Climbing

More Than a Sabbath: My Fast from Competing

More Than a Sabbath: My Fast from Earning

More Than a Sabbath: My Fast from Consuming

More Than a Sabbath: How to Fast the Other Six Days

Sabbath’s Rest to Delight

Here are two clips we watched on Sunday morning to consider how we might delight as a way of resting on Sabbath. We learned from Exodus 20 that we ought to rest as God rested in the creation story (Genesis 2.1-3). God’s rest at the beginning was a rest that included delighting!

Pure Joy on the Streets of Brighton and Madeline + Train.

If our lives are too busy so that we are too exhausted to dance and laugh and play on the Sabbath, then our lives are truly out of balance.

Sabbath Matters

SabbathWe started a new series at Christ Community Church on the Sabbath. You can listen along on our website, but we’d love to have you join us in person sometime!

Here’s a humorous, but very serious, ‘test‘ as to whether or not you need Sabbath in your life from Pete Scazzero.

This post encourages us to think about our children’s need for rest and that, as parents, we are not powerless to the demands of society for them. It also share the important lesson that Rhodes Scholar and Basketball player Clay Christiansen learned about the Sabbath: “life is just one series of extenuating circumstances not to do what is right.”

Also, Sabbath takes practice. Take it from this chaplain!

Look forward to more posts on the Sabbath in the weeks to come. Until then, may you enter into God’s rest.

Emotionally Healthy Pathway 4

Building on the previous week’s discussion of the “walls” we encounter in our maturation, this week we considered the possibility that great growth and transformation can happen in times of pain, grief, and loss (including coming to terms with our limits).

Pathway 4 to Emotionally Healthy Spirituality is “Enlarging Your Soul Through Grief and Loss.”

Here are 8 limits common to all of us.

In “On Grief and Growing Up”, Lee helps parents understand that what they feel guilty about may actually be grief over their kids growing up…

And, get a glimpse of one family’s journey to have their soul enlarged through the grief of losing a young mom.

Emotionally Healthy Spirituality Pathway 3

Emotionally Healthy SpiritualityWe’re continuing to learn how Jesus invites us to a healthier place emotionally and spiritually in all circumstances. This week, we considered how the hardest places in our life’s story can also be the places of great growth with Christ as we Journey Through the Wall.

To think a little more about what the wall is, read through “Deep in the Dark: Abiding During the Dark Night of the Soul.”

Or, learn these spiritual lessons from newborns… you might be surprised at how useful they are!

And to continue to think about what happens to your way of thinking because you’ve journeyed through the wall, here’s a short piece from Think Christian.

 

Pathway 1 to Emotionally Healthy Spirituality

The first pathway of Emotionally Healthy Spirituality (as laid out by Pete Scazzero) is Know Yourself that You May Know God. We started the conversation on Sunday by Current Sermon Series again to the story of David and Goliath in 1 Samuel 17. Here are some things to help you keep up the good work!

Consider the dangerous messages about feelings and emotions our culture has given us– especially for men and young boys. Is there a more God-honouring way?

Use this exercise to help you think through whether an idea is the truth about who you are, or a lie that is trying to bind you into a life and identity that doesn’t belong to you.

And here’s a meaningful prayer exercise you can use to help you think through your inner thoughts and daily activities in order to know yourself and God better.