Sabbath Basics

Last Sunday, our thanks to Peter Sinclair, who walked us through basics of Sabbath.

Marva Dawn was one of the theologians used to help us understand what God intends. To hear some of we heard on Sunday in Marva’s own voice, watch this video. The book is called Keeping the Sabbath Wholly: Ceasing, Resting, Embracing, Feasting. 

You can also watch stories of people who have taken up the command to remember the Sabbath day and have found that it has changed their lives.

And for fun, here’s another layer to the conversation in the arena of modern Sabbath.

Sabbath’s Freedom to Rest

What if we recognized having a “case of the Mondays” as a symptom of a larger problem? Cap explores what Sabbath rest signifies for our well-being.

On Sunday we talked about how Pharaoh’s way of slavery in Egypt was meant to dehumanize and control the Israelites. God’s gift of liberation and Sabbath was the gift of freedom to discover their God-given purposes. In “Healing a Life of Fear with Creativity,” Ken applies a similar line of thought to our lives today.

In 2014, Regent College offered an online forum on Sabbath called “Freedom in the Busy.” You can watch the video of the livecast or question & answers from leaders, including Ann Voskamp and Mark Buchanan, free of charge.

 

Sabbath Matters

SabbathWe started a new series at Christ Community Church on the Sabbath. You can listen along on our website, but we’d love to have you join us in person sometime!

Here’s a humorous, but very serious, ‘test‘ as to whether or not you need Sabbath in your life from Pete Scazzero.

This post encourages us to think about our children’s need for rest and that, as parents, we are not powerless to the demands of society for them. It also share the important lesson that Rhodes Scholar and Basketball player Clay Christiansen learned about the Sabbath: “life is just one series of extenuating circumstances not to do what is right.”

Also, Sabbath takes practice. Take it from this chaplain!

Look forward to more posts on the Sabbath in the weeks to come. Until then, may you enter into God’s rest.

Emotionally Healthy Spirituality Pathway 7

The final pathway of our series on growing an emotionally healthy spirituality is to go “the Next Step and Develop a Rule of Life.”

This discipline has been used in the church from some of its earliest times, but is perhaps most widely connected to life in monasteries and other intentional faith communities. Bottom line: They intentionally guide your growth towards God.

Need to be inspired to understand the power of a rule of life? Consider Mother Teresa.

Already practice a few spiritual practices? Use this reflection to help you think through changes.

All of this seem too much? How about focusing on one thing to do or one goal to keep in mind?

Finally, wondering what a rule of life in a community can look like for ‘normal’ people? Check out Awakening of Hope.

Emotionally Healthy Spirituality Pathway 6

We’re entering the home stretch of our journey of discovering emotionally healthy spirituality. This week we learned from Jesus as he talked with a lawyer about who should be considered a “neighbour” as we love God and our neighbours. (Luke 10.25-37)

To be able to have an extended definition of “neighbour” is a sign of “Growing into an Emotionally Mature Adult” (the sixth pathway).

Here are a couple more modern day examples to inspire you: one from Brian and one from Sarah.

And here’s  something to work through as a family.

Emotionally Healthy Pathway 5

By “Discovering the Rhythms of the Daily Office and Sabbath” we take another pathway to growing in our emotional and spiritual maturity.

Here are a just a few of the free online resources available for you to use to practice the Daily Office/Divine Hours:
Morning Prayer
Pray the Hours (choose your time zone to get the prayers for that hour)
Common Prayer (choose from the side menu which set of prayers you want to offer)

This discipline is meant to help you slow down throughout the day and take the time to commune with God. Read a little more about it.

Look forward to more on the Sabbath in a month or so!

Pathway 1 to Emotionally Healthy Spirituality

The first pathway of Emotionally Healthy Spirituality (as laid out by Pete Scazzero) is Know Yourself that You May Know God. We started the conversation on Sunday by Current Sermon Series again to the story of David and Goliath in 1 Samuel 17. Here are some things to help you keep up the good work!

Consider the dangerous messages about feelings and emotions our culture has given us– especially for men and young boys. Is there a more God-honouring way?

Use this exercise to help you think through whether an idea is the truth about who you are, or a lie that is trying to bind you into a life and identity that doesn’t belong to you.

And here’s a meaningful prayer exercise you can use to help you think through your inner thoughts and daily activities in order to know yourself and God better.

 

Emotionally Healthy Spirituality Week 1

Emotionally Healthy Spirituality.jpgWe’re doing a churchwide series using material from Peter & Geri Scazzero called Emotionally Healthy Spirituality. During this first week, we thought about the cost of emotional and spiritual immaturity by looking at Saul’s struggle in 1 Samuel 15. We closed our worship time asking the Holy Spirit to bring to our attention our areas of immaturity.

One of the ‘symptoms’ of emotionally unhealthy spirituality (as outlined by Pete in his book) is “Ignoring the emotions of anger, sadness, and fear.” Our links today provide some ideas on what to do instead of ignoring them.

Learn from David’s approach to fear and anger in “Two Quick Remedies for Anger, Hurt, and Fear.”

The Institute for Faith, Work & Economics helps us think through common fears that workers experience.

Finally, for those of us who carry sadness and regret about the past, there’s “How to Live with Regret” by Bill Lokey.

Advent Devotionals

We invite you to take the time this season to slow down from the hustle and bustle. There are lots of free devotionals that can help you do just that:

A downloadable weekly family devotional to go along with lighting your Advent Wreath Candles from The High Calling.

A downloadable Advent Paper Chain calendar to do with kids from KidsCorner (ReFrame Media).

A downloadable daily devotional and prayer guide (taken from Seeking God’s Face) for adults.

Sign up to get the short, daily Today devotional emailed to you directly. This year’s theme: “Waiting in Expectation.”

Or, join the CRC’s Office of Social Justice & World Renew for daily emailed devotionals having to do with “Displacement & Belonging.”