Emotionally Healthy Pathway 4

Building on the previous week’s discussion of the “walls” we encounter in our maturation, this week we considered the possibility that great growth and transformation can happen in times of pain, grief, and loss (including coming to terms with our limits).

Pathway 4 to Emotionally Healthy Spirituality is “Enlarging Your Soul Through Grief and Loss.”

Here are 8 limits common to all of us.

In “On Grief and Growing Up”, Lee helps parents understand that what they feel guilty about may actually be grief over their kids growing up…

And, get a glimpse of one family’s journey to have their soul enlarged through the grief of losing a young mom.

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Pathway 1 to Emotionally Healthy Spirituality

The first pathway of Emotionally Healthy Spirituality (as laid out by Pete Scazzero) is Know Yourself that You May Know God. We started the conversation on Sunday by Current Sermon Series again to the story of David and Goliath in 1 Samuel 17. Here are some things to help you keep up the good work!

Consider the dangerous messages about feelings and emotions our culture has given us– especially for men and young boys. Is there a more God-honouring way?

Use this exercise to help you think through whether an idea is the truth about who you are, or a lie that is trying to bind you into a life and identity that doesn’t belong to you.

And here’s a meaningful prayer exercise you can use to help you think through your inner thoughts and daily activities in order to know yourself and God better.

 

Emotionally Healthy Spirituality Week 1

Emotionally Healthy Spirituality.jpgWe’re doing a churchwide series using material from Peter & Geri Scazzero called Emotionally Healthy Spirituality. During this first week, we thought about the cost of emotional and spiritual immaturity by looking at Saul’s struggle in 1 Samuel 15. We closed our worship time asking the Holy Spirit to bring to our attention our areas of immaturity.

One of the ‘symptoms’ of emotionally unhealthy spirituality (as outlined by Pete in his book) is “Ignoring the emotions of anger, sadness, and fear.” Our links today provide some ideas on what to do instead of ignoring them.

Learn from David’s approach to fear and anger in “Two Quick Remedies for Anger, Hurt, and Fear.”

The Institute for Faith, Work & Economics helps us think through common fears that workers experience.

Finally, for those of us who carry sadness and regret about the past, there’s “How to Live with Regret” by Bill Lokey.

You and the Psalms

At Christ Community Church we’re beginning a short journey with the Bible’s song & prayerbook, the Psalms. On Sunday, Pastor Chelsey shared her prayer for the congregation through this series, that each of us would see how the Psalms are prayers that we can use today in a number of different ways: giving us words and images to pray, freeing us to express our true emotions or feelings, guiding us in theological reflection as we connect our lives with the words of the Psalms, helping us find ourselves in God’s big story and his people’s history, and serving as a launchpad for our own prayers.

To think more about what the Psalms, as God’s Word, have the power to do, read “Scripture Teaches us How to Speak.”

To read an example of the Psalms’ power today, learn from Micha and her son in “Lament and Faith and Childhood: Why my kid and I read the sad Psalms.”

To try your hand as a family, consider using these free downloadable and printable devotions from Robert and Laura Keeley.