Shining Love, not Hate

We’re continuing to learn from 1 John as a community at CCC. If you want to listen along, visit our church’s media player for the current sermon series as well as past messages. This week’s text was 1 John 1.5-2.11.

The first resource we’d like to draw your attention to is a recent book by Philip downloadYancey, Vanishing Grace: Whatever Happened to the Good News? In it, Yancey covers a lot of ground, including the various ways we can shine the truth of God as Christians.

Here are two posts that will give you a taste of the book as well as encourage you to think about how the way Christians love each other makes a difference for their witness to an unbelieving world.

First, what if we actually obeyed all of the ‘one anothers’ in the New Testament?

Second, what if we were seen as the early church was- in contrast to the rest of the world in how we treated and supported each other?

Finally, here’s a short prompt for reflecting on how the Christian community is defined in this day and age. Is this the way we really want it to be?

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“So if you have been raised with Christ, seek the things that are above.”

We’re continuing our look at the ways in which we are united with Christ our Saviour based on Colossians 3.1-17. Last week it was his death, this week it is his resurrection to a new life. You can listen to the message on our current series site.

Have you ever thought about what it looks like to live this new life with Christ? Should we– and others– be able to tell? Explore “Can I get a Witness: Living a Life that Reveals the Truth.”

Looking for some simple tips on living this new life? J.A. Medders offers some on his blog. The first one is: STOP LOOKING FOR HOT TIPS! It’s worth the short read and offers good advice on where to go from here.

Finally, here are a couple of book reviews relating the Christian life with the marks (aka fruit) of God’s presence and new life in Christ.
An Infinite Journey: Growing toward Christlikeness by Andrew M. Davis, reviewed by Tim Challies.
Fruit at Work: Mixing Christian Virtues with Business by Christ Evans, reviewed by Laura Boggess.

That other place you spend a lot of time

Home Sweet Cubicle

You probably spend more time at work than you do at Church. That’s one of the reasons why Larry argues that the workplace is full of untapped potential to witness to the unity of the body of believers.

J.B. shares how micro-prayers can help get you through the day at work.

And Melissa offers 8 ideas for living missionally at work.

This post is for members of the workforce who spend a significant amount of time at their workplace. It provides ideas and inspiration for living your faith in community.

Photo by Hey Paul Studios. Used with permission. Sourced by Flickr.

“Everybody’s Workin’ for the Weekend”

Everyone’s watchin’ to see what you will do
Everyone’s lookin’ at you, Oh
Everyone’s wonderin’ will you come out tonight
Everyone’s tryin’ to get it right, get it right

Everybody’s workin’ for the weekend…

Loverboy

Funny how Loverboy’s song hits on two different- yet important- views. First, there’s the opinion that work is about getting us to the weekend, filling the time between the fun with the money that funds our adventures. And then there’s the view that everyone’s watching, looking, wondering what we will do.

As Christians, our whole lives are a testimony to God, including the day jobs that get us to the weekend. How can we think about our daily work as part of our discipleship?

There are a number of good books on the subject to get you thinking. Check out a list of them here to get you started.

Or, here’s a shorter piece that will challenge you to see yourself as a contributor– the first role given to humans in the Garden of Eden.

Finally, be inspired by a real life story of faith, work, and doing things ‘right’ for the glory of God in “The Moral Mattress Kings of Denver” from Christianity Today’s series This is Our City.

This post is about work and our everyday jobs. It provides inspiration, a challenge and resources for thinking theologically about our callings.